Mentors Responsibilities

 

USP faculty mentors receive a $500.00 stipend to use as needed to support the research of their student. This money is tranferred to the mentor's department during the third week of September of each year.

Faculty mentors are agreeing to supervise and assist the scholar with his or her research project, including writing a research paper for possible publication and presenting a poster at the Undergraduate Research Symposium held in March. Student responsibilities are detailed at https://scholars.ufl.edu/scholars-responsibilities/ and students will not receive their stipend if they do not meet the requirements by the deadlines posted.

You will receive a brief student evaluation survey each semester to help us monitor your student's progress. Please complete these and also feel free to contact us if the student is not meeting your expectations at any time.

Details about how to meet the paper requirement if you have proprietary information, are not ready to publish the data, or have other concerns are found at https://scholars.ufl.edu/scholars-responsibilities/publication-requirement/ 

The National Council on Undergraduate Research has published a booklet entitled How to Mentor Undergraduate Researchers. If you would like a copy send a request to adonnelly@aa.ufl.edu.

Mentoring Tips!

  1. Remember, this is the first research experience for many of the USP scholars.
  2. This is often more of an educational experience for the student initially, rather than a productivity experience for the PI. Happily, sometimes both occur.
  3. Do not accept a student unless you and/or a grad student or postdoc can spend significant time with them.
  4. Meet regularly, at least once every 2 weeks to monitor progress.
  5. Assign readings, presentations, and if possible have them present a poster at a national meeting.
  6. Encourage students to self-manage their projects.
  7. Encourage artist/scholars to see the connections of their work as viable research endeavors to advance their individual fields.
  8. Be supportive and provide validation for the hard work your student is expending. Unsolicited assurance can help instill confidence.
  9. If possible, pair scholar with a graduate student for the mutual benefit of both.